FIND OUT MORE 
The literature of World War One has often focused on the verse of a small number of British poets whether it, be the sentimental idealism of Rupert Brooke or the war-weary disillusionment of Siegfried Sassoon but others adopted a different approach to its grim realities. 
August Stramm, born in the town of Cathedrals in 1874 was an Army Reservist and Civil Servant who had been a playwright and an early exponent of German Expressionism, or the deliberate distorting of reality for emotional effect and the evocation of feeling through the use of sound and image. 
 
Called up for service in World War One, Stramm was awarded the Iron Cross (Second Class) as a Company Commander in France before being transferred to the Eastern Front where he was shot through the head and killed in close-quarter fighting with the Russians near the town of Horodec on 1 September 1915, aged 41. 
Battlefield 
 
Yielding clod lulls iron off to sleep 
bloods clot the patches where they oozed 
rusts crumble 
fleshes slime 
sucking lusts around decay. 
Murder on murder blinks 
in childish eyes. 
 
Attack 
 
Scarves 
Wave 
Flutter 
Chatter 
Winds clatter. 
Your laughter blows 
Grasp hold 
Scuffle force 
Kiss 
Surrounded 
Sink down 
Nothingness 
 
War Grave 
 
Staffs flehen cross arms 
Writing zagt pale unknown 
Flowers impudent 
Dust shyly. 
Flare 
Water 
Glast 
Forgotten. 
Tagged as: Poetry
Share this post:

Leave a comment: 

Our site uses cookies. For more information, see our cookie policy. Accept cookies and close
Reject cookies Manage settings